"Your Landscape, Our Passion"
PO Box 620 Norway, ME 04268
Mon-Fri: 07:00 - 5:00
08 Mar 2017

Shrub & Tree Care

Shrub & Tree Care

Now that you have planned your landscape project, picked out and planted your shrubs or trees and they are established. Next you will want to take care of them and this will require knowing some of the basics and learning some insider tips will help your shrub or tree reach its full potential.
While both shrubs and trees add texture, color and structure to your landscape. They are an essential component to your landscape, as they create focal points for your landscape and the good news is that taking care of your shrubs or trees is relatively an easy task. Hopefully, you either kept the tags or wrote down the care instructions for your shrub or tree. Whether your plant was container grown or bare root grown, each will have different care requirements and routine maintenance of your shrubs and trees are a key factor for healthy growth. Part of that maintenance includes pruning, but what do you prune and when? Another part of that maintenance is feeding or fertilizing your shrubs or trees to insure that the soil has the proper nutrients it needs. Also a watering program will be needed, along with mulching are just some of the basics. Due to the vast amount and variations of shrubs and trees, we will add more blogs covering various pruning tips, fertilizing and soil care, watering, along with which tools to use for each pruning project.

04 Apr 2015

Investing in the soil

“Healthy soil is the foundation of a sustainable landscape.”

Investing in the soil is an integral part of the lawn and gardens ecosystem. A healthy soil provides the plants the oxygen, nutrients and water that’s needed to contribute to a healthy plant. There are a couple of ways that everyone can invest in the soil.

 First, by applying an organic matter, such as compost (approx. ½” coating) to your lawn and raking or watering it down in, to insure that the microorganisms and nutrients get to the soil surface. As the compost is watered in the soil, releasing microorganisms along with a small amount of nutrients into the soil.

The second way is to cover the soil surface with an organic mulch. As microorganisms near the soil surface and break it down, nutrients are released into the soil. The applied mulch will also regulate soil temperature, protecting the plant roots from stress from extreme heat and cold. The mulch will also reduce wind and water erosion and help preserve the soil’s organic matter. Mulch, also helps with water management by reducing the landscape’s need for water by slowing evaporation from the soil surface and decreasing water-hogging weed populations. Organic mulches provide shelter and food for beneficials like ground beetles and toads.

Note: If your soil is compacted, we would encourage you to do a core aeration before adding compost or an organic compost/ mulch mix. Also, you can use loam and we would suggest if you decide to go this route, to use a loam with a 20% compost mix (approx. ½” coating.)