Planting Trees and Shrubs

Whether you recently purchased a new home or are simply looking to do a landscape remodel to your existing landscape, we have a few thoughts for you to consider as you go through the planning process.

Before you get started, we suggest that you do a little research before purchasing and planting your trees or shrubs to see which would work best in your landscape, like which tree or shrub is best suited for soil, lighting and space.

A few things to consider:

1.) Draw a sketch of your landscape, including any existing perennial beds, trees, shrubs, along with any borders.

2.) Lighting is very important. Which direction is your home facing? East, means early morning sun and shade in the afternoon. If your home is facing the north, then you’ll need to choose something hardy, as the north is the coldest, while the south and west are the warmest.

3.) Water Management, you’ll need a plan for water and drainage.

4.) Planting & Maturity. Remember to always read the tag on the tree or shrub that you’re looking purchase.

Check for size at maturity

Sun exposure and hardiness

Also allow for enough space at maturity and don’t plant trees close to power lines, underground pipes, foundations, walkways or other trees.

5.) Right tree/ shrub right place, remember to choose only those trees or shrubs best suited for your landscapes space and lighting. Some trees/ shrubs like full sun, while other like partial shade.

6.) Maintenance: Planting, watering and mulch are only the first steps in caring for your new tree or shrub. Your new planting will require at least one inch of rainfall on a weekly basis for the first few growing seasons.

If you take precautions during the first three years, this will lessen the long term maintenance. Simply adding tree ring and applying bark mulch will help prevent weed growth, while preserving soil moisture and prevent any bark damage from lawn mowers.

When adding mulch, use 2-3″ at least the width of the drip line and pulling back any mulch that is at the base of the plant, so that it doesn’t encourage any rotting or diseases.