"Your Landscape, Our Passion"
PO Box 620 Norway, ME 04268
Mon-Fri: 07:00 - 5:00
08 Mar 2017

Shrub & Tree Care

Shrub & Tree Care

Now that you have planned your landscape project, picked out and planted your shrubs or trees and they are established. Next you will want to take care of them and this will require knowing some of the basics and learning some insider tips will help your shrub or tree reach its full potential.
While both shrubs and trees add texture, color and structure to your landscape. They are an essential component to your landscape, as they create focal points for your landscape and the good news is that taking care of your shrubs or trees is relatively an easy task. Hopefully, you either kept the tags or wrote down the care instructions for your shrub or tree. Whether your plant was container grown or bare root grown, each will have different care requirements and routine maintenance of your shrubs and trees are a key factor for healthy growth. Part of that maintenance includes pruning, but what do you prune and when? Another part of that maintenance is feeding or fertilizing your shrubs or trees to insure that the soil has the proper nutrients it needs. Also a watering program will be needed, along with mulching are just some of the basics. Due to the vast amount and variations of shrubs and trees, we will add more blogs covering various pruning tips, fertilizing and soil care, watering, along with which tools to use for each pruning project.

09 Jan 2017

Spring Projects

Sitting in the office on this bitter cold winter morning and thinking about this years spring projects, while searching the various plant selections, landscaping trends, other various products and equipment and thinking about the coming Home & Garden Shows as we head into the 2017 landscaping season.
There are so many plants, shrubs and variations of each, one could spend hours/ days searching and dreaming about which ones plants or shrubs to choose and the possibility adding veggies and creating a edible garden. Will your new garden have a live natural edge, a stone border, border plants (whether annuals or perennials) or possibly a raised box garden, one could even add a decorative concrete border.
Will there be children/ pets to consider when planning your new gardens or landscape projects. Their are so many ideas to rummage through and factors to consider during the planning process, one could be easily overwhelmed with all the information out there. But, don’t worry, we have plenty of time still to search and sift thru the many plants/ shrubs and stone choices during planning process before spring.
We would encourage everyone to get out to the Home & Garden Shows, talk to your local nurseries and garden clubbers for ideas and answers to any questions you may have.

04 Apr 2016

Pollinator Friendly Gardening

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Are your gardens pollinator friendly? We like to use native plants that yield high pollen counts in our garden designs and plantings to help support bees, butterflies, birds.

There are a few thing you should consider when planning a pollinator garden like:

Choosing plants that provide high nectar and pollen counts
A sunny spot, with a water source
Use native non-invasive plants
Use of plants that bloom throughout the season
Eliminate pesticide use

By planting a pollinator friendly garden, you will be playing a role in reversing the declining pollinator populations. Some native nectar and pollen plants are:

Bee Balm, Black Eyed Susan, Lavender, Lamb’s Ear, Catnip, Rosemary, Aster, Coneflower, Blazing Star, Primrose, Sage, Verbena, Goldenrod and Sunflowers.

29 Nov 2015

Using Natural Stone

Ever think of adding natural stone to your landscape, whether a walkway, patio, firepit or retaining wall. The use of natural stone will add character to any landscape, below is a natural stone walkway we put in on this property.

This project consisted of removing the old walkway, which went to an old entry off to the left and creating a new walkway to the new entryway. As we made the cut for the walkway, removing all roots, rocks and other barriers, we tamped the existing base and added a fabric barrier prior to putting in the new base. We then added a layer of stone dust, laid out our stones, setting and leveling them as we went and then swept in stone dust into the joints to form a locking joint.

Tips:

Be sure to compact the materials

Apply a fabric material between base materials (original base and main base.)

Do a dry run with your stone layout

Be sure to wet the project each time after sweeping the stone dust into the joints.

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